Western Isles
 Western Isles of Scotland

 

Resources
Recent bird sightings
Bird Photographs
Notes: A - Z Index
Notes: Taxonomic Index
Outer Hebrides Checklist
Useful contacts
Archived Sightings
Wildlife Garden
Bird ringing in Lewis

Bird Sightings : Hebrides : Snowy Owl

Hebrides Bird Sightings : Snowy Owl

Snowy Owl

(Arctic Owl, Great White Owl, Catyogle, Child's Snowman, Arctia Owl, Ermine Owl, Great White Owl, Harfang, Snowl Owl, Wapachthu, White Owl)

Nyctea scandiaca

Gaelic: Comhachag-bhan

 

Photograph © John Dempsey
Grenitote - North Uist - Outer Hebrides (Western Isles)
15th October, 2006

 

Our Snowy Owl photographs

Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl
Malacleit
North Uist
2005

Snowy Owl
Brue
Lewis
2006

Snowy Owl
Benbecula
2006
Snowy Owl
Brue
2006
Snowy Owl
Grenitote
North Uist
2005
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl
 
Snowy Owl
Brue
Lewis
2006
Snowy Owl
Melbost
Lewis
2007
Snowy Owl
Balranald
North Uist
2008
Snowy Owl
Uig
Lewis
May 2011
 

 

  • Snowy Owl
  • Nyctea scandiaca, Bubo scandiacus
  • Gaelic: Comhachag-bhan
  • UK: 3 records a year (BTO) (1958-2004 total of 159 records)
  • UK: accidental, former breeder
  • WI: Scarce vagrant (very small numbers recorded in most years) TBC
  • Distribution: Primarily resident circumpolar - North of the Arctic Circle. Europe, North Asia, North North America. Nomadic bird - shortage of prey forces it to more Southern tundra breeding sites. Nests on ground - a scrape on a mound, rock or gravel bar. (Areas with good visibility & good hunting). An abandoned eagle nest sometimes used. Breeds in May, laying 5 -14 eggs). Winter: fields & prairie
  • Diet: Hunting style "sitting and waiting", bird has sharp talons & catches prey on ground, in air or fish from surface of water. Lemmings, voles & other rodents, small birds , fish, carrion
  • All white. Upright stance. Body barrel-shaped. Head rounded. Eyes yellow & staring. Bill black. Male almost pure white. Female (largest bird) & young covered with narrow black bars & crescent-shaped spots. Heavily feathered feet (together with bird's thick plumage suitable for life in the Arctic)

 

A nesting pair were found on the Island of Fetlar in Shetland in 1967. During the next few years they bred and and fledged 23 young. A second female joined them in 1972, but she was unsuccessful in fledging her young - perhaps because the male could not provide for two broods. The male left in 1976, and did not return. An immature male was later found nearby but did not join the two females. (see Birds Britannica)

BBRC Snowy Owl records 1990-2006
3, 4, 1, 5, 5, 1, 4, 3, 1, 1, 1, 3, 0, 1, 1, 7, 2,

Up to 6 Snowy Owls were recorded in The Western Isles in 2006. Times do change, there is an old record of a gamekeeper in Ness shooting 3 Snowy Owls in one day (see Peter Cunningham's: Birds of the Outer Hebrides).

Makes a sound called "clapping" when threatened or annoyed (the sound is probably made by clicking of the tongue).

If prey is small enough the Snowy Owl usually swallows it whole, the bird's stomach juices digesting the flesh and it's gut compacting the fur, bones etc into a pellet which it then regurgitates. The owl frequently uses the same perch to regurgitate from, so there may be a lot of pellets marking this area.

 

Snowy Owl records in the Western Isles

Scarce vagrant (very small numbers recorded in most years) TBC


The chart below shows how abundant the Snowy Owl is during a month or when you are more likely to see it.

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

(Source: Outer Hebrides Birds Checklist)

 

 

 

 

Other local bird photographs

Sources of information for the bird sightings section

John's Blog of his two week stay in the Uists


back to page top

Home Contact Webmaster

Copyright © 2005-2011 Western Isles Netspace.  User Agreement and Privacy policy